Country, Culture, People, Future

May 2012

Federal Court recognises joint native title rights of the Nyangumarta and Karajarri peoples

Posted: May 28th, 2012

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Nyangumarta and Karajarri dancers

On Friday May 25, the Federal Court handed down a native title determination to the Nyangumarta and Karajarri communities across shared country near 80 Mile Beach in Western Australia.

The Nyangumarta/Karajarri joint determination resolves two overlapping claims of the Nyangumarta and Karajarri peoples, two different tribal groups who share traditional laws and cultural connection to the area. Justice North handed down the Federal Court’s decision at an on-country determination at Anna Plains Station.

The Kimberley Land Council and the Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation acted on behalf of the Karajarri and Nyangumarta claimants to negotiate native title across 2,000 square kilometres of land and sea country across Anna Plains Station, a portion of Mandora Station and 80 Mile Beach, in the East Pilbara and West Kimberley regions of WA. 

Kimberley Land Council Executive Board Member and Karajarri Traditional Owner Anthony Watson said the Nyangumarta/Karajarri joint native title determination highlighted how two tribal groups could work together to achieve land rights.

“Today’s determination is about co-operation and respect for each other. For these two groups to come together, acknowledge their shared interests in this country and achieve a successful native title consent determination is very powerful,’’ he said.

Nyangumarta Traditional Owner Margaret Rose said, “Years ago, this country was shared between the two groups, from way back. Native Title brought conflict because we each had to prove that the land was ours. But through strong connection to country, we were able to show how both groups are connected to the land together. This brings hope that other groups can follow this example and share country in a happy spirit. It’s appropriate that this is happening in reconciliation week.”

Simon Hawkins, CEO of YMAC, congratulated the groups on their achievement, “The Nyangumarta and Karajarri people should be very proud, this is a positive achievement for everyone. This is a historic day, and a cause for celebration.”
YMAC will be posting more photos and video from the determination on our website soon. For the full media release, click here

Wajarri Yamatji Traditional Owner Speaks Out On Proposed Heritage Reforms

Posted: May 25th, 2012

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In an interview this morning on ABC Mid West radio, Wajarri Yamatji Traditional Owner, Anthony Dann, has responded to the State Government’s recent discussion paper on proposed changes to the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 (AHA).

In the interview, Mr Dann strongly outlined his concerns about the short timeframe for comment on such significant changes to the protection of Aboriginal heritage, and the lack of consultation with Traditional Owners over the proposed reforms.

Mr Dann said that Aboriginal people are rapidly losing their input into heritage development under the AHA, as Traditional Owners aren’t offered the same appeal opportunities as land developers.

After announcing a 12 month review into Aboriginal cultural heritage processes last May, the Government has held no formal consultation with Traditional Owners and only allowed five weeks for comment on the proposed changes to the AHA outlined in the discussion paper.

Mr Dann also said a significant review of the AHA was needed because it does not provide adequate protection for Aboriginal Heritage, and that Native Title negotiation processes are at present the only means for Traditional Owners to take part in consultations over protected Aboriginal sites.

For more information about the proposed reforms to the AHA, including links to the discussion paper and YMAC’s media release, please click here.

Nyangumarta and Karajarri Joint Native Title Recognition, ABC Radio, May 2012

Posted: May 25th, 2012

On Friday May 25, the Federal Court handed down a native title determination to the Nyangumarta and Karajarri communities across shared country near 80 Mile Beach in Western Australia.

The Nyangumarta/Karajarri joint determination resolves two overlapping claims of the Nyangumarta and Karajarri peoples, two different tribal groups who share traditional laws and cultural connection to the area. Justice North handed down the Federal Court’s decision at an on-country determination at Anna Plains Station.
The Kimberley Land Council and the Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation acted on behalf of the Karajarri and Nyangumarta claimants to negotiate native title across 2,000 square kilometres of land and sea country across Anna Plains Station, a portion of Mandora Station and 80 Mile Beach, in the East Pilbara and West Kimberley regions of WA.

 

More information:

Federal Court recognises joint native title rights of the Nyangumarta and Karajarri people- 28 May 2012

Case Study: Joint native title rights for the Nyangumarta and Karajarri peoples

Changes to WA Aboriginal Heritage Act Anthony Dann Radio Interview May 2012

Posted: May 24th, 2012

In an interview on ABC Mid West radio, Wajarri Yamatji Traditional Owner, Anthony Dann, responded to the State Government’s 2012 discussion paper on proposed changes to the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 (AHA).

In the interview, Mr Dann strongly outlined his concerns about the short timeframe for comment on such significant changes to the protection of Aboriginal heritage, and the lack of consultation with Traditional Owners over the proposed reforms.

Mr Dann said that Aboriginal people are rapidly losing their input into heritage development under the AHA, as Traditional Owners aren’t offered the same appeal opportunities as land developers.

After announcing a 12 month review into Aboriginal cultural heritage processes last May, the Government has held no formal consultation with Traditional Owners and only allowed five weeks for comment on the proposed changes to the AHA outlined in the discussion paper.

Mr Dann also said a significant review of the AHA was needed because it does not provide adequate protection for Aboriginal Heritage, and that Native Title negotiation processes are at present the only means for Traditional Owners to take part in consultations over protected Aboriginal sites.

For more information about the proposed reforms to the AHA, including links to the discussion paper and YMAC’s media release, please click here.

Changes to WA Aboriginal Heritage Act Anthony Dann Rad…iew May 2012.m4a

Posted: May 24th, 2012

Casual Positions for Indigenous Journalists at Yamaji News

Posted: May 21st, 2012

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Yamaji News is looking for casual Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander columnists and reporters to join their team.

Yamaji News is Western Australia’s only Indigenous newspaper, and is dedicated to publishing local stories relevant to WA’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community. It encourages positive news, programs and events that promote the achievements of Indigenous people and their organisations.

The newpaper is also seeking expressions of interest for articles and photographs, and advertisment bookings for the June 2012 NAIDOC special edition, which are due by 8 June 2012.

Those interested in writing for the Yamaji News should send an example of their work and a current resume to Paul Ihanimo at paul@yamaji.com.au or call him on 0429 888 022.

For more information on the position, please click here.

Black Impact: Indigenous Australia documentary competition

Posted: May 18th, 2012

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Screen Australia and ABC television are calling on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander filmmakers to submit one hour documentary proposals for ‘Black Impact’, a special initiative which aims to give voice to distinctive Indigenous Australian stories.

Documentary ideas should be bold, creative and deliver fresh insights into contemporary Black Australian life. The four most most original ideas will be developed, with two chosen for possible television production.

Each application must have Indigenous Australians in key creative roles.

The deadline for applications is 5:00pm Friday, 25 May 2012.

For guidelines and eligibilty, visit the Screen Australia website or contact the Indigenous Department of Screen Australia by phoning (02) 8113 5974, or by email indigenous@screenaustralia.gov.au

New Community Program for Indigenous Women in Geraldton

Posted: May 11th, 2012

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A new program supporting Indigenous women who have experienced domestic violence will begin next week in Geraldton.

The program, run by Centacare Family Services, aims to strengthen family relationships and help create positive change in lives through services such as counselling and spiritual healing.

The sessions will take place in a group therapy setting and discussions will remain strictly confidential. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss topics with professionals who specialise in areas such as domestic violence, grief or loss, general health, substance abuse and stress management.

There are five sessions in all, with the first beginning Tuesday 15 May at the Spalding Family Centre on Mitchell Street, Geraldton from 9am-12pm.

To register and organise an initial one-on-one chat with the facilitator, call the Geraldton Family Relationship Centre on 9921 2611.

For more information please visit the Centacare Geraldton website or the Geraldton Family Relationship Centre website.

YMAC attends launch of ‘Kurlumarniny- We come from the desert’

Posted: May 4th, 2012

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At the book launch in Warralong yesterday 

Yesterday YMAC representatives attended the launch of Monty Hale’s bilingual book ‘Kurlumarniny – We come from the desert’ at the Warralong community.

Monty Hale is one of the quiet achievers of Indigenous Australia , and one of its greatest intellectuals. A senior Nguliparti man from the Pilbara region, his book tells of his family’s migration from the desert to the station country in the eastern Pilbara, his childhood growing up on Mt Edgar Station, witnessing Australia’s engagement in World War two and the famous Pilbara station-workers strike of 1946. The remarkable bilingual publication, written in Nyangumarta and English, tells Monty’s experiences though his vast cultural knowledge and his strong desire to leave a record of his life.

The book will soon be available to purchase from Wangka Maya Language Centre and is a remarkable record of Aboriginal life in the Pilbara.  

Visit http://www.wangkamaya.org.au/ for more Indigenous publications from the Pilbara.