Country, Culture, People, Future

Board

Meet a YMAC Director

Posted: December 13th, 2010

Filed under: , ,

Roy Bellotti – YMAC Director

Roy is a Malgana man who has lived and worked in the Gascoyne region all his life.

Roy has deep connections to the world heritage listed Shark Bay area, where his grandmother and father were both born.

He enjoys the outdoors and regularly camps, hunts and fishes on his country.

He has been a member of the Yamatji Region Executive Committee since November 2004 and YMAC’s Chairperson since February 2008. Roy is well known in the community for his leadership capacity and ability to unite people.

Meet a YMAC Director

Posted: November 30th, 2010

Filed under: , , ,

Peter Windie – Yamatji Chairperson

Peter is a Thudgari man who played an integral leadership role in his people’s native title determination in 2009. Peter lives in Gascoyne Junction and is a well respected community leader is the region. He is chairman of the Windi Mia Aboriginal Corporation, which is currently pursuing possible tourism and pastoral ventures in the Yamatji region.


Peter is passionate about country and how deeply Aboriginal people are spiritually connected to the land.

Meet a YMAC Director

Posted: November 10th, 2010

Filed under: , ,

Nora Cooke
Nora is an Ngarla woman who played an integral role in her people’s native title determination in 2007.

Nora enjoys the bush life in the Pilbara, including fishing, camping, cooking and hunting. Nora has an in-depth understanding of bush medicine and provides advice to people seeking bush medicine treatments. She also practices her culture by teaching several Aboriginal languages and running cultural awareness training at mine sites and the Wangka Maya Language Centre.
To Nora, country means to live freely on the land, gathering food and hunting.

Our Chairperson wins ‘Elder of the Year’ Award

Posted: July 14th, 2009

Filed under: , ,

Mrs Doris Eaton, Aboriginal Elder and YMAC’s Co-Chairperson  was announced Female Elder of the Year at Friday night’s NAIDOC Awards in Brisbane.
 

Mrs Eaton was recognised for her cultural leadership and work with Aboriginal communities in the Pilbara.  On receiving the award, she sais her driving force is to make sure younger generations learn strong culture from their Elders.

“Preserving culture is important to make sure the next generation has a sense of identity. Elders need to teach the youth their language, dreaming stories and cultural practices. First learn your own culture and then you can be strong enough to move between the two worlds, to marry Aboriginal and mainstream cultures together.

I’m honoured to receive the award, it’s a good feeling. We need to keep learning and sharing and encouraging each other to move forward.”