Country, Culture, People, Future

Gnulli

YMAC News issue 26 is available now

Posted: February 13th, 2015

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YMAC News issue 26 front coverThe latest issue of YMAC News is now available. Our cover story is about the delegation of over 70 Traditional Owners from all over the state who converged on Parliament to send a message about protecting Aboriginal heritage. Over 1600 signatures were collected and presented on the day. We have been disappointed with the Government’s response so far, with the Aboriginal Heritage Amendment Bill introduced to Parliament just one week later without any of the changes that would make heritage protection stronger.

This issue includes some good news stories, about an agreement between the Wajarri Yamatji people and Sinosteel Midwest that was several years in the making, and some Carnarvon students who are benefiting from an earlier native title agreement.

We are also taking some time to look back on our achievements as YMAC celebrates 20 years as a land council. We have included an excerpt from the commemorative book about the brave men and women of the Pilbara strike in the 1940s and how their legacy resonates today.

Click here to read these stories and more.

You can send your feedback to editor@ymac.org.au. Thank you for reading this issue of YMAC News!

 

YMAC News issue 24 now available for download

Posted: June 16th, 2014

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YMAC News issue 24 FRONT COVERThe latest issue of YMAC News is now available for you to download. Our cover story is about the Banjima people’s on-country native title determination at Karijini National Park, and includes lots of photos from the day.

There is also a story about a significant win in the High Court by the Ngarla people that will have ramifications for native title claims nation-wide.

The Kurama and Marthudunera people and the Gnulli people have both entered into agreements with resource companies that are featured in this issue.

Click here to read these stories and more.

You can send your feedback to editor@ymac.org.au. Thank you for reading this issue of YMAC News!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Language programs in Geraldton

Posted: September 10th, 2012

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The Bundiyarra Irra Wangga Language program offers a variety of Indigenous language classes and workshops. These include:
    • Language Awareness Community Workshops on the languages of the Murchison-Gascoyne Regions (including Badimaya, Malgana, Nhanda, Wajarri and Yinggarda).
    • Community Wajarri Language Classes (held on Saturday mornings at the Bundiyarra complex)

       

 

  • The Master and Apprentice Language Teaching Model; where younger people (apprentices) learn to speak language with support from older speakers (masters)

     

 

 

  • Community Language Nests focusing on the immersion of children between 0 – 5 in their local language

 

 

Bundiyarra Irra Wangga also has a range of educational material available, including books, posters, flashcards and the recently completed Wajarri Dictionary.
Irra Wangga strives to preserve, maintain and promote the languages of the Murchison-Gascoyne regions of Western Australia, which are becoming increasingly threatened and endangered.
The language program is currently looking for sponsors to help with the delivery of language related activities that assist the whole community to grow in understanding, pride and the learning of Aboriginal languages.
If you are interested in sponsoring any of the language program’s activities or events, please contact Jennifer Kniveton, Language Program Coordinator, on (08) 9920 7900.
For more information on any of these programs, or to purchase educational materials, please contact Irra Wangga directly on (08) 9920 7950.

 

YMAC is a proud supporter of the Bundiyarra Irra Wangga language program

YMAC News issue 15 is here

Posted: September 15th, 2011

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YMAC is pleased to share the latest issue of YMAC News, which is now available It is filled with information about the great work being done by traditional owners and YMAC staff across the two YMAC regions.

Issue 15 of our newsletter highlights native title agreements for the Kariyarra and Gnulli people, a major step forward for the Bunjima people, some impressive achievements by YMAC staff and our organisation’s firm resolve on the issue of constitutional recognition for Australia’s original inhabitants.

We hope you enjoy the 15th issue of YMAC News.

Click here to download an electronic version  or email srosenfeld@ymac.org.au to request hard copies for yourself, your family, your business or workplace.






YMAC leads the way in agreement making

Posted: August 12th, 2011

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This week has been a busy one for both regions of YMAC, with the Kariyarra and Gnulli native title groups signing agreements that secures both financial and cultural heritage benefits for the communities involved.

Congratulations to all parties involved in these agreements. YMAC looks forward to continuing to achieving great results for our clients and leading the way in agreement making in Australia.

Kariyarra agreement paves the way for development in Port Hedland

On Monday 8 August, the Kariyarra people and the WA State Government signed a native title agreement which will pave the way for much needed residential and commercial development of land in the Town of Port Hedland.

The Department of Regional Development and Lands (DRDL) has agreed to transfer a number of parcels of land to the Kariyarra people, in exchange for their consent to the release of land within the South Hedland townsite and port of Port Hedland. Under the agreement, a total of around 5,000 hectares of land will be transferred to the Kariyarra people. Key features of the agreement include the transfer of 10 hectares of freehold land in South Hedland suitable for residential development and land at 12 Mile for rural residential development. The Kariyarra people will also share in the profits from the sale of lots developed within the broader agreement area. The Kariyarra people will also gain management of several extensive reserves, which include important cultural sites.

Traditional Owners sign agreement to protect Indigenous heritage

On Thursday 11 August, Baiyungu Traditional Owners signed an agreement with Rio Tinto’s Dampier Salt to protect Indigenous heritage in WA’s Midwest. The signing ceremony between the Gnulli native title claim group and Rio Tinto took place at Dampier Salts Lake Macleod operation, some 100 kilometres north of Carnarvon.

The agreement signed between the two parties establishes guidelines on the protection of Indigenous culture, and importantly, the consultation of Traditional Owners on all heritage matters in the area. Lake Macleod is of special cultural significance to the Gnulli people, whose traditional country covers approximately 87,876 square kilometers of land and sea; including the towns of Carnarvon, Coral Bay and Exmouth. Lake Macleod is the westernmost lake in Australia and recognised as a wetland of national importance due to the abundance of birdlife and the fact that the lake is periodically inundated by freshwater.

Aboriginal enterprise for Coral Bay

Posted: October 29th, 2010

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BAC Representatives with YMAC’s Co-Chairperson Roy Bellotti and CEO Simon Hawkins



An agreement signed this week between the Baiyungu Aboriginal Corporation (BAC) and Lands Minister Brendon Grylls, will allow for the development of much-needed housing for permanent workers and business owners in Coral Bay.
Involving the transfer of 30ha of land near the town centre, the agreement will enable the BAC to develop accommodation for people who live and work locally. The BAC has also agreed to lease a portion of the land back to the State Government, for the new seasonal staff accommodation facility planned for Coral Bay.
BAC Project Director, Noel Bridge, said it had taken several years of quality and focused work by the Corporation to reach a successful outcome. 
“Coral Bay is a stunning tourism destination, but the development of infrastructure has not kept up with demand.  The lack of quality housing for workers and business owners has made it very difficult to attract and retain staff.
Mr Bridge said the BAC had received support from the Gnulli Native Title Working Group and Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation, and had worked effectively with the WA Department for Regional Development and Land to reach this successful outcome.
Paul Baron Gnulli Working Group Chairman said the agreement would allow Traditional Owners to maintain their connection to their land, create jobs, economic development, and enhance the local community.
“These types of projects have the added advantage of giving visitors the chance to share Baiyungu land and culture,” he said.