Country, Culture, People, Future

Iron Ore Holdings

Download YMAC News issue 20

Posted: February 20th, 2013

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The latest issue of YMAC News is now available for download.

It is full of stories about some of the accomplishments in our regions over the last few months. Agreements have been made between the Ngarlawangga people and Montezuma Mining Company Ltd, and the Kurama and Marthudunera people and Iron Ore Holdings Ltd, that are both notable for different reasons.

You can read about the Geraldton native title groups coming together to work towards an Alternative Settlement, and a meeting between Pilbara indigenous women and African women in mining.

We have several new members of our Yamatji Regional Committee and the Board of Directors, and we profile one of them, Beverley Ladyman.

The Badimia people won a battle in the National Native Title Tribunal to help protect one of their most sacred sites, and the Nyiyaparli people have discovered a site that was occupied 41,000 year ago while out on a heritage survey for a mining company.

We also answer one of our most frequently asked question, ‘Why does native title take so long?’

Click here to dowload YMAC News issue 20.

If you have any stories or photos you’d like to share with us, elders who you think we should profile, questions about native title, or any other letters to the editor, send them to editor@ymac.org.au.

We hope you enjoy this issue of YMAC News.

Native title agreement recognises the importance of water

Posted: November 20th, 2012

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Kurama and Marthudunera Traditional Owners Bernadette Evans, Roy Evans, Joan Evans and Cyril Lockyer with YMAC staff and IOH representatives

The Kurama and Marthudunera (K&M) native title group today announced the signing of an agreement with Iron Ore Holdings Ltd (IOH) over their Buckland Project in the Pilbara region of Western Australia.

It is the Pilbara’s first native title agreement to provide payments in respect of the use of water and clearance of native vegetation, giving an incentive for IOH to minimise their impact on the environment. IOH also showed flexibility in planning their mine footprint in order to avoid any impact on culturally sensitive sites near the area.

In addition to strong cultural and environmental protection, the agreement provides milestone and production payments, which are now standard features of native title land access agreements.

Kurama and Marthudunera Traditional Owner, Cyril Lockyer said, “The important thing now is to continue our good working relationship. This area is of great significance to the families involved and we want to work closely with Iron Ore Holdings to see these sensitive places protected.”

“This unique agreement is due to the genuine good-will and flexibility shown by both parties, and recognises the cultural and environmental significance of the area for the Traditional Owners. It goes well beyond the requirements of the WA Aboriginal Heritage Act by recognising that water and habitat are inextricably linked to cultural values,” said Simon Hawkins, CEO of Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation.

Nyiyaparli Sign Agreement for Iron Valley Project

Posted: December 1st, 2010

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In Tom Price this week, the Nyiyaparli people signed a Land Access Deed with Iron Ore Holdings Ltd (IOH) that delivers important protection for country and support to the Iron Valley project.


Nyiyaparli country is situated in the central Pilbara region of Western Australia and covers approximately 36,684 square kilometres of land, including the mining town of Newman.


The agreement, which covers the Iron Valley project, provides a range of benefits to the Nyiyaparli people including contracting opportunities, cross cultural awareness training for IOH employees and a rigorous framework for agreement implementation. More importantly the agreement provides for consultation on environmental and heritage matters, which allows the Nyiyaparli people to retain their rights under Aboriginal heritage and environment legislation in order to protect areas of cultural and environmental significance.


The Nyiyaparli people, represented by Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation (YMAC), are now looking to build upon the spirit of cooperation and good faith they developed with IOH during the agreement negotiation process.


Simon Hawkins, CEO, Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation, said the agreement was an example of a mining company working cooperatively and negotiating in good faith with Traditional Owners. “The Nyiyaparli people appreciated the company’s willingness to sit down and negotiate with the group. The next step is to build on this relationship and see the agreement successfully implemented.”