Country, Culture, People, Future

Lake Moore

Download YMAC News issue 20

Posted: February 20th, 2013

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The latest issue of YMAC News is now available for download.

It is full of stories about some of the accomplishments in our regions over the last few months. Agreements have been made between the Ngarlawangga people and Montezuma Mining Company Ltd, and the Kurama and Marthudunera people and Iron Ore Holdings Ltd, that are both notable for different reasons.

You can read about the Geraldton native title groups coming together to work towards an Alternative Settlement, and a meeting between Pilbara indigenous women and African women in mining.

We have several new members of our Yamatji Regional Committee and the Board of Directors, and we profile one of them, Beverley Ladyman.

The Badimia people won a battle in the National Native Title Tribunal to help protect one of their most sacred sites, and the Nyiyaparli people have discovered a site that was occupied 41,000 year ago while out on a heritage survey for a mining company.

We also answer one of our most frequently asked question, ‘Why does native title take so long?’

Click here to dowload YMAC News issue 20.

If you have any stories or photos you’d like to share with us, elders who you think we should profile, questions about native title, or any other letters to the editor, send them to editor@ymac.org.au.

We hope you enjoy this issue of YMAC News.

Protection for Lake Moore in Midwest WA

Posted: November 9th, 2012

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The Badimia people’s ability to protect one of their most sacred places has recently been given a boost when the WA State Government dropped an appeal of a decision by the National Native Title Tribunal (NNTT). Lake Moore, a dry salt lake in the southern Murchison region of WA, has been found to be culturally significant by the NNTT on several occasions.

The NNTT has repeatedly found that as a site of particular significance, resource exploration licences that overlap the lake cannot be granted without negotiating with the Badimia people first. The State appealed the NNTT’s latest decision on the significance of Lake Moore, but recently discontinued the appeal.

Lake Moore Gypsum, the company seeking an exploration licence, now needs to negotiate with the Badimia people to reach an agreement about the exploration activities.

Lake Moore, located south of Paynes Find, is a very special area where Badimia families go every year to hunt, camp, collect bush medicines, and teach young people about their country and culture. Lake Moore and the surrounding area is not only important as a place for Badimia families to go out on country, but it is home to very sacred places where ceremonies traditionally took place.

Badimia protects Lake Moore

Posted: June 23rd, 2011

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Yesterday the National Native Title Tribunal handed down a decision that will help the Badimia people look after Lake Moore and the many places around it that are important to the Badimia people.

Lake Moore, a dry salt lake south of Paynes Find, is a very special place for Badimia people. Many Badimia people visit the area with their families every year to go camping, hunting, collecting bush medicines and teaching the younger generations about country and culture. Lake Moore and the surrounding area is not only important as a place for Badimia families to go out on country, but it is home to very sacred places where ceremonies traditionally took place.

The National Native Title Tribunal recognised how important this place is for the Badimia people by ruling that the company seeking a mineral exploration licence has to negotiate with the Badimia people before it can have access to the area for low-impact exploration activities. This will allow the Badimia people to have more of a say over access to the area, and will give them a chance to make sure the mineral explorers have an understanding of the significance of the area.