Country, Culture, People, Future

Midwest

The West Australian Indigenous Story Book

Posted: May 6th, 2014

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The Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia began West Australian Indigenous Story Book project since 2011. Four editions have been released so far; the Kimberley and Pilbara edition, the Perth and Peel regions edition, the Pilbara and Midwest edition and the Goldfields/Esperance and Great Southern edition.

Each edition is a collection good news stories from indigenous, and sometimes non-indigenous, people who have contributed to social, economic, health and environmental outcomes for their communities.

For more information or to access the stories visit the PHAIWA website.

 

Yamatji Arts showcase

Posted: March 7th, 2014

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Geraldton’s ACDC Gallery is preparing for chock-a-block year ahead.

They’ve kicked things off last month with the Yamatji Arts showcase displaying brilliant work of some of the Midwest’s Aboriginal Artists. On display are paintings, baskets and beautiful decorative pieces from a wide range of artists.

The Yamatji Arts showcase will be running until 15th March at the ACDC Gallery located at 33 Marine Tce in Geraldton. For more information on this and other upcoming exhibits click here to visit their facebook page.

Badimia strike agreement with Minjar Gold

Posted: November 1st, 2013

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The Badimia People, Traditional Owners in the Mid-West of WA have signed a native title  agreement with Minjar Gold for its proposed mining operations and future expansions, approximately 400kms north-north east of Perth.

“The Badimia people are looking forward to a beneficial relationship with Minjar Gold,”  said Reg Yates, Chairperson of the Badimia Working Group. “It is important that this  agreement gives preferential contracts to Badimia businesses. That is very valuable,  because it allows us to be partners in the process, and gives Badimia people a sense of  pride.”

Click here to read the full media release, or

check out the story on ABC here.

Badimia People sign Native Title Agreement with Top Iron

Posted: May 23rd, 2013

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Click to enlarge
L-R: Greg Knox (Top Iron), Nick Revell (Top Iron), Badimia Traditional Owner Frank Walsh Jnr., Bruce Richardson (Top Iron), Kevin Stemp (Top Iron), with YMAC claim lawyer Paul Avina.

The Badimia People, Traditional Owners of land in the Midwest region of Western Australia, are pleased to announce they have entered into an agreement with Top Iron Pty Ltd. The agreement paves the way for the iron ore miners to develop their Greater Mummaloo Project in Badimia country, near the existing Extension Hill project.

The Badimia people will benefit from preferential contracting opportunities and employment targets on the project, as well as financial compensation linked to the project’s production. The company has also agreed to hand over all housing units and light vehicles to the Badimia people at the end of the project, further enhancing opportunities for Badimia businesses.

The agreement also includes several provisions to protect and promote Badimia culture and heritage, including heritage survey protocols, Badimia cultural awareness workshops for Top Iron employees, and avoidance of certain areas that are important to Badimia cultural heritage.

Badimia working group member Frank Walsh Jnr. said of the agreement, ‘Badimia people have once again shown that they can reach agreements like this with mining companies in our region and that we are quite supportive of those companies who totally respect and understand our Badimia people and culture.

‘At the end of the day it is about empowering our people and communities. The financial aspects of these agreements are important, but the economic and employment opportunities, as well as heritage protections that arise out of these agreements, are also very significant’.

Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation (YMAC) CEO Simon Hawkins said, ‘The agreement was reached swiftly, after Top Iron made efforts to develop a positive relationship with the Badimia people before the formal negotiations began.

‘The company made an effort to understand the community’s aspirations and concerns, so the negotiations went very smoothly and only took two formal meetings. This has laid the foundations for a good relationship between both parties for the future of the agreement’.