Country, Culture, People, Future

The Miners

YMAC News issue 23

Posted: February 18th, 2014

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The latest issue of YMAC News is now available online.

Our cover story features YMACs recognition from the Western Australian business community for excellence in the area of Aboriginal Leadership Development at the inaugural AIM WA/WestBusiness Pinnacle Awards on 28 November 2013.

In this issue you can read about the historic discovery of a rare wooden artifact found in Monkey Mia.

There is also information about a number of agreements YMAC has been working on throughout the regions. As well as a except from a recently published book The Miners – Stories from the industry that drives modern Australia, by Barry Avery, in which CEO Simon Hawkins is featured.

Click here to download YMAC News issue 23 or browse earlier issues here.

Read our excerpt from “The Miners”

Posted: November 26th, 2013

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Yamatji Marlpa’s CEO Simon Hawkins was featured in the recently published The Miners – Stories from the industry that drives modern Australia, by Barry Avery.

The Miners is available at www.theminers.net.au with proceeds going to the Starlight Foundation:

Read the excerpt here:

The 1992 event that has become known as the Mabo Decision changed the landscape of mining and exploration in Australia forever. This was a landmark High Court ruling that recognised the legal concept of Native Title for the first time, rejecting the previously held doctrine of terra nullius. It gave the Indigenous traditional owners certain legal rights to their land.

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The Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation (YMAC), of which Simon Hawkins has been chief executive for the past decade, is an organisation that represents 25 Aboriginal cultural groups across the Pilbara, Murchison and Gascoyne regions of Western Australia – including dealing with Australia’s major resource developers with respect to Native Title claims. Hawkins explains that recognition of Native Title does not give a veto over mining or development, as traditional owners cannot stop mining from going ahead. What it does give these groups is a right to negotiate, allowing development to go ahead while claims are being resolved. ‘This gives traditional owners a seat at the table – to have a say about how mining will unfold on their country,’ he says.

‘When I started as chief executive in 2003, the mining boom was ramping up and companies which previously had poor relationships with Aboriginal people were now knocking on our door. Within my first few weeks on the job, Rio Tinto said it wanted to do a comprehensive agreement in the Pilbara. (more…)