Country, Culture, People, Future

Wajarri

Two native title wins this week!

Posted: April 27th, 2018

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This has been a week of celebration for YMAC’s Traditional Owner stakeholders.

On Monday 23 April 2018, the Wajarri Yamatji community celebrated the recognition of its second determination of native title (called the Part B Determination) by the Federal Court of Australia. This determination follows the Part A Determination that was made by the Federal Court in October 2017 over approximately 68,743 square kilometres of land and waters. The Part B Determination recognised the native title of the Wajarri community over an area of approximately 12,252 square kilometres of land and waters in the Murchison and Gascoyne regions. It includes parts of the Shires of Upper Gascoyne, Murchison, Yalgoo, Meekatharra and Cue. The determination covers unallocated Crown land, Aboriginal-held pastoral leases and a number of Aboriginal reserves and communities.

On Thursday 26 April 2018, the Robe River Kuruma community celebrated recognition of its native title at an on-Country Federal Court hearing at Parlapuuni (Panawonica Hill). The determination area includes the middle Robe, the Bungaroo Valley and the Buckland Ranges. The determination area lies in the Shire of Ashburton in Western Australia’s Pilbara region, with Part B covering approximately 5,720 square kilometres.

Read YMAC’s media releases for more information on both determinations.

To watch the KM Determination Part B video by Ngaarda Media click here. To view the photos click here.

Geraldton goes Wajarri

Posted: November 17th, 2014

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Berlin-based artist Pia Lanzinger has developed a project called Geraldton goes Wajarri, as part of a larger program by Perth-based arts organization Spaced. Geraldton goes Wajarri  is designed to provide a forum for the conservation of this language by smuggling Wajarri into the public spaces of the City of Greater Geraldton (Jambinu). 

Although Amangu is the traditional language of the area, today Wajarri is the most commonly spoken Aboriginal language in the Greater Geraldton region of Western Australia.

The launch of Geraldton goes Wajarri, including “adopt a word” will be held this Thursday 20th November, 6 – 7:30pm at the Geraldton Regional Library.

For more information visit http://www.spaced.org.au/projects/pia-lanzinger/

Wajarri Driving Program

Posted: October 31st, 2014

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Having a drivers license is a very important step in securing a job, particularly in country area’s where public transport is limited.

Wajarri Community members recognised the difficulty some young people were experiencing in obtaining a drivers license, particularly in regards to completing their log book hours. In conjunction with Sinosteel Midwest Corporation the community was able to set up the Wajarri Drive Program which provides Wajarri young people with the opportunity to log 50 hours with the Keen Brothers Driving School.

This year’s program has already received some great feedback from participants. If you are interested in being involved in 2015 you can register with Sinosteel Midwest’s Wajarri Liaison Officer Marianne Miller on 0457 020 152 or email mmiller@smcl.com.au

NITV Documentary – Our Footprint

Posted: August 12th, 2014

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Tomorrow night NITV will be showing the documentary Our Footprint featuring Wajarri Traditional Owner Ross Boddington.

The film is part of the Indigenous Community Stories initiative, a joint project from ScreenWest, Rio Tinto, Leighton, Ngarda and the Film and Television Institute (FTI) WA. The initiative has captured many stories from across Western Australia. Among them are stories from Jurruru, Wajarri and Badimaya. For more information on the project click here to visit the FTI website.

Our Footprint with Ross Boddington will be shown on NITV at 7.30pm, 13th August.

 

Language programs in Geraldton

Posted: September 10th, 2012

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The Bundiyarra Irra Wangga Language program offers a variety of Indigenous language classes and workshops. These include:
    • Language Awareness Community Workshops on the languages of the Murchison-Gascoyne Regions (including Badimaya, Malgana, Nhanda, Wajarri and Yinggarda).
    • Community Wajarri Language Classes (held on Saturday mornings at the Bundiyarra complex)

       

 

  • The Master and Apprentice Language Teaching Model; where younger people (apprentices) learn to speak language with support from older speakers (masters)

     

 

 

  • Community Language Nests focusing on the immersion of children between 0 – 5 in their local language

 

 

Bundiyarra Irra Wangga also has a range of educational material available, including books, posters, flashcards and the recently completed Wajarri Dictionary.
Irra Wangga strives to preserve, maintain and promote the languages of the Murchison-Gascoyne regions of Western Australia, which are becoming increasingly threatened and endangered.
The language program is currently looking for sponsors to help with the delivery of language related activities that assist the whole community to grow in understanding, pride and the learning of Aboriginal languages.
If you are interested in sponsoring any of the language program’s activities or events, please contact Jennifer Kniveton, Language Program Coordinator, on (08) 9920 7900.
For more information on any of these programs, or to purchase educational materials, please contact Irra Wangga directly on (08) 9920 7950.

 

YMAC is a proud supporter of the Bundiyarra Irra Wangga language program

Native Title Stories: Victor Mourambine

Posted: September 6th, 2012

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Watch Yamatji committee member Victor Mourambine reflect on his experiences of native title in Austalia.

This is the fourth in a series of interviews with our committee and board members, in which they share their stories of country and culture. See previous interviews with Ben Roberts, Susan Oakley, and Diane Stewart. 

Wajarri dictionary launch in Geraldton

Posted: April 4th, 2011

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On Tuesday, 12 April the Irra-Wangga Geraldton Language Program will launch a Wajarri Dictionary at an event in Geraldton. The dictionary will be published through Irra-Wangga with funding from the Commonwealth Government’s Maintenance of Indigenous Languages and Records Program, and is largely the work of linguist Doreen Mackman. The dictionary will be for sale through Irra-Wangga at Bundiyarra Aboriginal Corporation.

The launch of the dictionary is open to the public. It begins at 6:30pm on the Geraldton foreshore near the Dome cafe. There will be speeches, a performance by the Mayu performers and a free screening of the 1984 film “Fringe Dwellers”.

YMAC congratulates all those involved in this significant achievement. Language is an important part of culture and this dictionary is a great way to make sure that Wajarri culture is passed down through the generations.




Wajarri Yamatji country

 

Reaching for the Stars: Wajarri story on SBS!

Posted: April 13th, 2010

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At 6pm tonight ‘Living Black’ on SBS will feature a story on the Pia community school in Wajarri country and the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP).

Last year, the Wajarri people signed an Indigenous Land Use Agreement for the construction of the ASKAP project. The agreement had a particular focus on education and training opportunities for the Pia Aboriginal community school, just 30 kms from the telescope construction site.

Happy viewing!

Update: watch it here:

http://player.sbs.com.au/naca/#/naca/living_black/Latest/playlist/Reaching-for-the-Stars/

Agreement for ASKAP telescope

Posted: November 26th, 2009

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The Wajarri People today celebrated the conclusion of the Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA) for the construction of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope (ASKAP)

The agreement was announced at Parliament House by the Wajarri People, their representativesYMAC, the Hon Christian Porter MLA, the Hon Brendan Grylls MLA, the Hon Troy Buswell MLA, and Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).

The Wajarri People have approximately 2000-3000 community members and one of the largest native title claims in Australia. Wajarri country includes the area chosen for the Australian Square including the area chosen for the ASKAP telescope. The agreement area covers approximately 130 square kilometres of land, located 175 kilometres west of Meekatharra.

The agreement provides financial and non-financial benefits and ensures the cultural heritage of the Wajarri People is protected. Also, with a focus on Pia Aboriginal Community (just 30kms from the proposed SKA site), the agreement also included education opportunities, internet access and cadetships and mentoring for Wajarri kids.

Anthony Dann, Wajarri Traditional Owner said, “The myth that native title holds up development is false; this agreement was completed in record time and the future is looking bright. I look forward to the prospects that education, employment and training opportunities can bring to our community. It’s an exciting time for Wajarri People, the Mid-West and Australia that such a major development will be happening in our country.”

Image: Wajarri Representative, Anthony Dann.

Media coverage:
http://www.watoday.com.au/wa-news/traditional-aborigines-shoot-for-the-stars-20091126-jugy.html

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/technology/sci-tech/native-title-claimants-support-galaxy-quest-20091127-jvlw.html