Country, Culture, People, Future

YMAC

Nyangumarta Warrarn TEK project gets published

Posted: January 24th, 2017

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899 Ethno booklet cover

 

With the support of YMAC, the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program, and the Indigenous Protected Areas Program, the Nyangumarta Warrarn Aboriginal Corporation has published a compilation of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) of the Nyangumarta Warrarn Indigenous Protected Area (IPA).

The booklet is a collection of ethno-botanical information passed down through generations of Nyangumarta people. More than 80 plants were collected, and descriptions of 70 species appear in the book. The data was collected during two surveys of Nyangumarta country in 2014 and 2015.

A copy of the booklet can be obtained through Nyangumarta Warrarn Aboriginal Corporation, and digital copies of the booklet can be downloaded from the YMAC website here.

2015/2016 Annual Report now available

Posted: November 7th, 2016

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YMAC is pleased to present its Annual Report for the 2015/2016 financial year.

In this reporting period, YMAC has achieved a number of significant outcomes for Traditional Owners across the Yamatji and Pilbara regions. These achievements include consent determinations for the Jurruru and PKKP peoples, recognition for the Ngarluma people, and the dedication of an Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) for the Nyangumarta people.

Significant agreements also took place between Traditional Owners and miners, including a 100-year deal between the Banjima people and BHP Iron Ore that will ensure a bright future for Banjima culture and traditions.

For more information about our work during the reporting period, you can download a copy of the Annual Report here.

Petition calling for inquiry into DAA

Posted: October 27th, 2016

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Resolutions passed at the on-Country Bush meeting held at Yule River in September included calling for an inquiry into the Department of Aboriginal Affairs (DAA) and the Aboriginal Cultural Materials Committee (ACMC). We are calling on the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia to action this. Have your say by signing and distributing this petition.

Original signed copies of the petition must be returned to YMAC by 15 December 2016 – copies, including scans and faxes, cannot be submitted. Even if the petition has only one signature on it, post it back to us – every signature counts.

You can download the petition here, and the resolution demanding the inquiry here. Signed copies of the petition can be mailed to our Perth office:

Yamatji Marlpa Aboriginal Corporation – Level 8, 12-14 The Esplanade, Perth WA, 6000

YMAC News issue 30

Posted: June 17th, 2016

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The latest issue of YMAC News is now available.

In this issue, we are excited to introduce a new project between the Nanda people, Knowledge Partnerships and the Department of Parks and Wildlife to install interpretive signage throughout Kalbarri National Park.

Also in this issue we remember the 1946 Pilbara Strike, the longest strike in Australian history. We’re also excited to share photographs and updates about the Nyangumarta Rangers and what they are doing for their Country, and we celebrate the training and development successes of young Aboriginal men at the Clontarf Academy in Carnarvon.

To request a hard copy or to give us any feedback, email editor@ymac.org.au.

Country Needs People Indigenous Protected Area and Rangers

Posted: March 17th, 2016

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Nyangumarta Rangers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Country Needs People is a not-for-profit campaign working towards a positive outcome for Indigenous Protected Areas through the care by Indigenous Rangers.

The campaign is fighting for the continued growth and security of current and future opportunities for land and sea management by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

To show your support for this campaign sign the petition letting the Prime Minister know you support the growth of Indigenous Ranger Programs go to Country Needs People Invest In Success.

 

 

 

 

YMAC News issue 29

Posted: March 3rd, 2016

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The latest issue of YMAC News is now available

We are very happy to share stories and photos of preservation evidence captured on Kuruma Marthudenera Country and a Knowledge Partnerships Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) project near Pannawonica.

We’re also delighted to highlight the successful Ngarluma determination, celebrate the Banjima people’s agreement with BHPIO and profile a pillar of the Badimia community.

To request a hard copy or to give us any feedback, email editor@ymac.org.au.

 

 

 

Yule River 2015 – Aboriginal community demand answers from WA Government

Posted: September 30th, 2015

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To Find out More Click Below:

Aboriginal community demand answers from WA Government

 

 

 

 

Watch the 2015 On-Country Bush Meeting at Yule River

Posted: September 22nd, 2015

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In September of 2015, Traditional Owners from across Western Australia met at Yule River to discuss their concerns about the WA Aboriginal Heritage Act Amendment Bill and the State Government’s Regional Services Reform Plan.

This film documents the participants, processes, and outcomes of that meeting.

For more information about the 2016 On-Country Bush Meeting at Yule River, you can download the flyer here.

The 1946 Pilbara Strike featured in ABC Northwest News Article

Posted: September 8th, 2015

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In a recent article by ABC Northwest WA, the 1946 Pilbara Strike was featured. Aboriginal pastoral workers in the Pilbara walked off their jobs against the oppressive work conditions they were facing.

In our Celebrating 20 Years of YMAC, the story of the 1946 strike was shared in the Aboriginal Leadership chapter. The 1946 strike was the first strike by the Aboriginal People and the longest in Australian History.

The reason behind the strike was in protest to the low pay, or in some instances rations instead of pay. The strike was planned by about 200 elders from 23 different groups and more than 800 workers left stations. Some were forced to return to work while others formed new occupations. Many of them formed strike camps and gathered bush tucker, skins and engaged in mining activities to provide food and money for the people there.

Two of the key leaders in the movement were Ernie Mitchell and Peter Coppin. During the course of the strike, they re-gained the lease of the Yandeyarra Station in 1967 and set up an Aboriginal-run community and a community and pastoral enterprise.

YMAC’s Co-Chair Doris Eaton and Deputy Regional Manager Nyaparu Rose are the daughters of Ernie Mitchell and Peter Coppin. This tangible connection provides YMAC with a strong connection to the history of social justice and leadership.